Ed Hawkins Writes Book on Match Fixing in the 2011 Cricket World Cup

Ed Hawkins, a well known sports-betting journalist from Britain, has written a book regarding corruption in the cricket world. The book was recently published by the Daily Mail. It is entitled Bookie, Gambler, Fixer, Spy.

Not only has Hawkins said that he is exposing match-fixing that allegedly took place during the 2011 World Cup semi-final between India and Pakistan, he has said that he plans to expose other corruption that exists in the cricket world of Satta betting.

Hawkins was alerted to the match-fixing in this match when he received detailed Twitter messages that came from an Indian bookie while the game was taking place. The Twitter message came through during the first innings and accurately predicted the final result of the game.

While gambling on cricket is illegal in India, Hawkins nevertheless managed to befriend bookmakers both online and in person when he traveled to India, meeting with bookies in Mumbai, Delhi, Rajasthan, and Bhopal. Hawkins notes that he met with not only bookies, but also punters and fixers, and that it was clear after speaking to them that the sport was corrupt. In fact, many of those that he met with openly said that the sport has been corrupted for large financial gain.

Hawkins has noted that he has written this book, exposing corruption in cricket in the hopes that it will “get under the fingernails of the bookmakers, punters and fixers who seek to corrupt cricket.” In order to do this, he has explained that he has a total of 45 names of international domestic cricketers that have allegedly been part of the corruption in the sport. Some of these cricketers are former cricket players, while others are still currently on the pitch. For legal reasons, these players have not been named in the book.

In Bookie, Gambler, Fixer, Spy, Hawkins talks about players, illegal bookmakers, governing bodies, fixers, politicians, and even organized crime in connection with the corruption that has taken place, along with intimidation and even alleged murders.